Institutions of Global Governance & Civil Society

Mike Pompeo is unfit to lead the CIA if he doesn't reject torture

Mike Pompeo is unfit to lead the CIA if he doesn't reject torture

January 12, 2017

From Carr Center Senior Fellow Alberto Mora.

 

"Among the flurry of confirmation hearings happening this week in the Senate, one in particular will signal whether President-to-be Donald Trump and his administration are, indeed, serious about restoring the failed and discredited Bush-era torture policy.

Trump’s pick for CIA chief, the US representative Mike Pompeo… Read more about Mike Pompeo is unfit to lead the CIA if he doesn't reject torture

PolicyCast - The Challenges Faced by Human Rights Organizations with Sushma Raman

PolicyCast - The Challenges Faced by Human Rights Organizations with Sushma Raman

December 21, 2016

While human history is replete with examples of repression and the struggle against it, it wasn’t until 1948 that the world came together to declare in one voice the sanctity of each individual’s dignity. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was a triumph of the post-war period, and while the world is by most measures a far better place today than in 1948, the declaration’s adoption was not the end of the fight for human rights, but the beginning.

Ensuring security, justice, and equality for… Read more about PolicyCast - The Challenges Faced by Human Rights Organizations with Sushma Raman

Donald Trump raises specter of treason

Donald Trump raises specter of treason

December 16, 2016

 

A specter of treason hovers over Donald Trump. He has brought it on himself by dismissing a bipartisan call for an investigation of Russia’s hacking of the Democratic National Committee as a “ridiculous” political attack on the legitimacy of his election as president.

Seventeen US national intelligence agencies have unanimously concluded that Russia engaged in cyberwarfare against the US presidential campaign. The lead agency, the CIA, has reached the further conclusion that Russia’s hacking was intended to influence the election in favor of Trump.

Read more about Donald Trump raises specter of treason

Resisting Trumpism in Europe and the United States

Resisting Trumpism in Europe and the United States

December 2, 2016

Article by Senior Fellow John Shattuck.

Authoritarian democracy is on the march on both sides of the Atlantic. Despite alarming parallels, the U.S. remains better positioned to preserve and rebuild true democracy.

The election of Donald Trump shows what happens when democracy misfires. It echoes recent developments in Europe, most notably in Hungary and Poland, where elected leaders are attacking democratic pluralism, minority rights, and civil liberties, keeping the forms of… Read more about Resisting Trumpism in Europe and the United States

International pressure on US human rights matters now more than ever

International pressure on US human rights matters now more than ever

November 11, 2016

These are dangerous times.  Never has it been so important for domestic and international human rights advocates and scholars to collaborate.  Such action must be guided by past successes in promoting human rights, based on our best history and social science. I share Stephen Hopgood’s sense of urgency, but I disagree with his recommendation that we should only engage in domestic politics and abandon international human rights norms and law. 

We will need even stronger domestic movements to… Read more about International pressure on US human rights matters now more than ever

Announcing the 2016-17 Carr Center Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program

Announcing the 2016-17 Carr Center Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program

November 7, 2016

In 2016-17, the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy is pleased to launch its Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program, which seeks to build a strong, sustainable community of current Harvard Kennedy School students—and future alumni—who demonstrate a clear and passionate commitment to the study, practice, and advocacy of human rights.

falseThis new program, directed by Carr Center faculty member Dr. Timothy Patrick McCarthy, is designed to enhance… Read more about Announcing the 2016-17 Carr Center Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program

Shattuck Center Named in Honor of Outgoing CEU President John Shattuck

Shattuck Center Named in Honor of Outgoing CEU President John Shattuck

November 1, 2016

Central European University has named the Shattuck Center on Conflict, Negotiation and Recovery in honor of outgoing CEU President and Rector, and current Senior Carr Center Fellow, John Shattuck. The center at the School of Public Policy was established by Shattuck in 2012, to "develop new approaches to conflict resolution and recovery, focusing on integrated responses that tackle issues where the current responses are… Read more about Shattuck Center Named in Honor of Outgoing CEU President John Shattuck

From Brexit to African ICC Exit: A Dangerous Trend

From Brexit to African ICC Exit: A Dangerous Trend

October 31, 2016

Burundi, South Africa, and the Gambia are not violating international law merely by announcing their withdrawal from the Rome Statute that created the International Criminal Court. In accordance with Article 127 of the Rome Statute, they have every right to go.

Contrary to what some commentators seem to believe, the ICC and the Rome Statute system will not disappear because of some withdrawals. The Statute can still function with 121 states or even less. Think about it this way: in 2003, I was appointed as ICC Prosecutor by 78 states. In those days, the Bush Administration was… Read more about From Brexit to African ICC Exit: A Dangerous Trend

2016 Oct 18

Restoring the Rule of Law In Guatemala with Iván Velásquez Gómez

4:00pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Adams House LCR (26 Plympton Street, Cambridge

 

Join Iván Velásquez Gómez, UN High Commissioner for the International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala, (CICIG) as he describes his battles against illegal security groups and clandestine security  organizations in Guatemala – criminal groups believed to have infiltrated state institutions, fostering impunity and undermining democratic gains in Guatemala since the end of the country's armed conflict in the 1990s. The CICIG  represents an innovative initiative by the United Nations, together with a Member State, to strengthen the rule of law in a post-conflict country.… Read more about Restoring the Rule of Law In Guatemala with Iván Velásquez Gómez

Kathryn Sikkink gives Plenary address at APSA 2016

Kathryn Sikkink gives Plenary address at APSA 2016

September 5, 2016

Carr Center's Kathryn Sikkink gave the Plenary address at the 2016 American Political Science Association's Annual Meeting. Her talk, "Are We Making Progress in Human Rights? Transformations in Knowledge and Activism,”  drew on material from her forthcoming book Making Human Rights Work: Evidence for Hope.  

Said Sikkink, "recently there has been a surge of pessimism about the legitimacy and effectiveness of human rights law, institutions, and movements… Read more about Kathryn Sikkink gives Plenary address at APSA 2016

Kathryn Sikkink

A Measure of Justice

July 11, 2016

In a new feature story in the Harvard Kennedy School Magazine, Kathryn Sikkink's work on documenting human rights violations is examined in depth.

"Sikkink, the Ryan Family Professor of Human Rights Policy, has devoted her career to addressing that question and the one that follows from it: How can human rights abuses be prevented? Over the past 40 years, she has tracked an evolving, relatively new norm she calls the “justice cascade,” which has increased accountability for human rights offenders, a recent example being the Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic. In… Read more about A Measure of Justice

2016 Oct 05

The International Criminal Court (Study Group)

2:30pm to 4:30pm

Location: 

Nye C

The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy is delighted to announce that Fellow Luis Moreno-Ocampo will lead a study group on the ICC this semester.

Moreno-Ocampo, the first-ever Prosecutor of the ICC, will convene a dynamic group of select students and researchers from across Harvard University to workshop chapters of his forthcoming book on the emergence and evolution of the ICC.

The group will meet:

Carr Conference Room (Except for October 5th - Nye C)
2:30-4:30 PM
September 8th, October 5… Read more about The International Criminal Court (Study Group)

Blake’s book conveys a straightforward directive: the foreign policy of liberal states should be guided and constrained by the goal of helping other states to become liberal democracies as well. This much is what we owe to people in other countries—this much but nothing more. The primary addressees are wealthier democracies, whose foreign policy ought to be guided by the idea of equality of all human beings. My approach in On Global Justice bears important similarities to Blake’s, but with those similarities also come equally important differences. The purpose of this piece is to bring out these similarities and differences and in the process articulate some objections to Blake.

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