Human Security

How Trump Can Work with Russia to Challenge the Status Quo and to Control ISIS

How Trump Can Work with Russia to Challenge the Status Quo and to Control ISIS

January 18, 2017

New article in JustSecurity from Senior Fellow Luis Moreno Ocampo.

"What should President Donald Trump do if ISIS crashed a plane into the Freedom Tower next September 11, 2017? After 16 years of a so-called “war on terror,” would experts be able to provide the new President with a clear and effective strategy to confront international terrorism? A short answer to the question is no. In 2015,… Read more about How Trump Can Work with Russia to Challenge the Status Quo and to Control ISIS

How to defend human rights in the Trump era

How to defend human rights in the Trump era

January 25, 2017

Carr Center's Senior Fellow John Shattuck's latest Op-Ed in the Boston Globe.

"The Women’s March and demonstrations throughout the country last weekend served notice on President Trump that if he persists in assaulting human rights, he will face massive resistance.

Recent presidents who threatened rights have been reined in. Richard Nixon used the power of the presidency to attack the Constitution and his political enemies, but… Read more about How to defend human rights in the Trump era

Mike Pompeo is unfit to lead the CIA if he doesn't reject torture

Mike Pompeo is unfit to lead the CIA if he doesn't reject torture

January 12, 2017

From Carr Center Senior Fellow Alberto Mora.

 

"Among the flurry of confirmation hearings happening this week in the Senate, one in particular will signal whether President-to-be Donald Trump and his administration are, indeed, serious about restoring the failed and discredited Bush-era torture policy.

Trump’s pick for CIA chief, the US representative Mike Pompeo… Read more about Mike Pompeo is unfit to lead the CIA if he doesn't reject torture

2017 Jan 10

Forum: Inclusive Security: Stop a War and Thwart the Next

6:00pm to 8:00pm

Location: 

Harvard Kennedy School JFK Forum 79 JFK Street

Speaker(s): Swanee Hunt

Date: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 6:00pm

A Conversation with Ambassador Swanee Hunt
The Eleanor Roosevelt Lecturer in Public Policy

From Colombia to Syria, women are at the frontlines of preventing conflict, negotiating ceasefires, and helping their countries rebuild after war. Defying death threats and armed groups, they are… Read more about Forum: Inclusive Security: Stop a War and Thwart the Next

PolicyCast - The Challenges Faced by Human Rights Organizations with Sushma Raman

PolicyCast - The Challenges Faced by Human Rights Organizations with Sushma Raman

December 21, 2016

While human history is replete with examples of repression and the struggle against it, it wasn’t until 1948 that the world came together to declare in one voice the sanctity of each individual’s dignity. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was a triumph of the post-war period, and while the world is by most measures a far better place today than in 1948, the declaration’s adoption was not the end of the fight for human rights, but the beginning.

Ensuring security, justice, and equality for… Read more about PolicyCast - The Challenges Faced by Human Rights Organizations with Sushma Raman

Donald Trump raises specter of treason

Donald Trump raises specter of treason

December 16, 2016

 

A specter of treason hovers over Donald Trump. He has brought it on himself by dismissing a bipartisan call for an investigation of Russia’s hacking of the Democratic National Committee as a “ridiculous” political attack on the legitimacy of his election as president.

Seventeen US national intelligence agencies have unanimously concluded that Russia engaged in cyberwarfare against the US presidential campaign. The lead agency, the CIA, has reached the further conclusion that Russia’s hacking was intended to influence the election in favor of Trump.

Read more about Donald Trump raises specter of treason

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, donations were too little too late

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, donations were too little too late

November 29, 2016

Written by Carr Center Research Assistant Tom O'Bryan.

Countless studies have shown that democracies are less likely to go to war, torture their own citizens, and censor the media. That's one reason why Western governments and philanthropic foundations funnel more than $10 billion every year into promoting democracy overseas. For example, donors fund efforts to help train election observers, educate voters about their rights, and train local media outlets to cover political issues.

In the last year, more than $70 million have been spent on such projects in the Democratic… Read more about In the Democratic Republic of Congo, donations were too little too late

Resisting Trumpism in Europe and the United States

Resisting Trumpism in Europe and the United States

December 2, 2016

Article by Senior Fellow John Shattuck.

Authoritarian democracy is on the march on both sides of the Atlantic. Despite alarming parallels, the U.S. remains better positioned to preserve and rebuild true democracy.

The election of Donald Trump shows what happens when democracy misfires. It echoes recent developments in Europe, most notably in Hungary and Poland, where elected leaders are attacking democratic pluralism, minority rights, and civil liberties, keeping the forms of… Read more about Resisting Trumpism in Europe and the United States

These GOP foreign policy pros are wary of working for Trump

These GOP foreign policy pros are wary of working for Trump

November 17, 2016

Members of the conservative foreign policy intelligentsia, who spent the eight long years of the Obama administration biding their time at think tanks and universities, finally have a shot at upper level administration jobs

But now that those coveted Washington positions as deputy secretaries, assistant secretaries, and the like are finally open, many are racked with new anxiety: Is it a good idea to serve in a Trump administration if you disagree deeply with Donald Trump?...

“It’s not good,” said Alberto Mora, a senior fellow at the Harvard Kennedy… Read more about These GOP foreign policy pros are wary of working for Trump

International pressure on US human rights matters now more than ever

International pressure on US human rights matters now more than ever

November 11, 2016

These are dangerous times.  Never has it been so important for domestic and international human rights advocates and scholars to collaborate.  Such action must be guided by past successes in promoting human rights, based on our best history and social science. I share Stephen Hopgood’s sense of urgency, but I disagree with his recommendation that we should only engage in domestic politics and abandon international human rights norms and law. 

We will need even stronger domestic movements to… Read more about International pressure on US human rights matters now more than ever

Announcing the 2016-17 Carr Center Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program

Announcing the 2016-17 Carr Center Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program

November 7, 2016

In 2016-17, the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy is pleased to launch its Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program, which seeks to build a strong, sustainable community of current Harvard Kennedy School students—and future alumni—who demonstrate a clear and passionate commitment to the study, practice, and advocacy of human rights.

falseThis new program, directed by Carr Center faculty member Dr. Timothy Patrick McCarthy, is designed to enhance… Read more about Announcing the 2016-17 Carr Center Emerging Human Rights Leaders Program

Shattuck Center Named in Honor of Outgoing CEU President John Shattuck

Shattuck Center Named in Honor of Outgoing CEU President John Shattuck

November 1, 2016

Central European University has named the Shattuck Center on Conflict, Negotiation and Recovery in honor of outgoing CEU President and Rector, and current Senior Carr Center Fellow, John Shattuck. The center at the School of Public Policy was established by Shattuck in 2012, to "develop new approaches to conflict resolution and recovery, focusing on integrated responses that tackle issues where the current responses are… Read more about Shattuck Center Named in Honor of Outgoing CEU President John Shattuck

From Brexit to African ICC Exit: A Dangerous Trend

From Brexit to African ICC Exit: A Dangerous Trend

October 31, 2016

Burundi, South Africa, and the Gambia are not violating international law merely by announcing their withdrawal from the Rome Statute that created the International Criminal Court. In accordance with Article 127 of the Rome Statute, they have every right to go.

Contrary to what some commentators seem to believe, the ICC and the Rome Statute system will not disappear because of some withdrawals. The Statute can still function with 121 states or even less. Think about it this way: in 2003, I was appointed as ICC Prosecutor by 78 states. In those days, the Bush Administration was… Read more about From Brexit to African ICC Exit: A Dangerous Trend

Carr Center’s Strategic Consequences of the U.S. Use of Torture – Conference Report

Carr Center’s Strategic Consequences of the U.S. Use of Torture – Conference Report

October 20, 2016

On October 7th & 8th, the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, in coordination with the West Point Center for the Rule of Law, hosted the Strategic Consequences of the U.S. Use of Torture. Executive Director Sushma Raman, and Harvard Kennedy School Dean Douglas Elmendorf gave opening remarks. Faculty Director Douglas A. Johnson welcomed the speakers, and Lieutenant Colonel Winston Williams was the first panelist to speak. 

Watch the introductory panel:

Read more about Carr Center’s Strategic Consequences of the U.S. Use of Torture – Conference Report

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