Human Security

2016 Sep 20

Human Rights and Technology (Study Group)

Repeats every 2 weeks every Tuesday until Tue Nov 15 2016 .
2:30pm to 3:30pm

2:30pm to 3:30pm
2:30pm to 3:30pm
2:30pm to 3:30pm
2:30pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Taubman 401

*Please note - Registrations are now closed for the semester*

The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy is delighted to announce that Senior Fellow Steven Livingston will lead a study group on “Human Rights & Technology” this semester.

The group will meet every other Tuesday from 2:30pm – 3:30pm throughout the Fall semester (Sept 20th, Oct 4th, Oct 18th, Nov 1st, Nov 15th).

Together,...

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More Than Blood

Blog by Tim McCarthy.

Original Post Here.

We awoke to news of the carnage in Orlando. I had slept in — the first long, good night’s sleep after a hell of a week: a funeral, my 45th birthday, graduation, another funeral, and a graduation party. I woke up refreshed, but not for long. Several friends had already texted or sent me Facebook messages warning of the pain that was to come, the massacre that had already taken place.

“...

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Carr Center for Human Rights Policy to screen Hollywood feature film, TRAFFICKED

Carr Center for Human Rights Policy to screen Hollywood feature film, TRAFFICKED

September 14, 2016

CAMBRIDGE, MA — The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, located at the Harvard Kennedy School, is pleased to announce that we will be screening the feature film, TRAFFICKED, starring Ashley Judd, Anne Archer, Patrick Duffy, and Sean Patrick Flannery.  The film is written and produced by Carr Center Fellow, Siddharth Kara, based on his award-winning first book 'Sex Trafficking: Inside the Business of Modern Slavery'. The screening is a collaboration with Harvard’s South Asia Institute, and will be followed by a panel discussion, featuring:

  • ...
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John Shattuck. 4/26/2016. “US needs to help the EU end the refugee crisis.” The Boston Globe. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The refugee crisis is at the center of Europe’s political war. Some European countries are building walls to exclude people seeking refuge from the deadly conflicts in the Middle East, while others — notably Greece, Germany, and the Nordics — are working to reinforce EU values of openness and tolerance. The United States should do more to promote these values by increasing its support for relief efforts and opening its doors to refugees from the Middle East. European governments this year are contributing four times more money than the United States to the financially strapped United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Meanwhile, the United States will resettle a minuscule 10,000 Syrian refugees, compared with more than 500,000 in Germany.

Introducing Carr Center's 2016-2017 Fellows

Introducing Carr Center's 2016-2017 Fellows

August 25, 2016

The Carr Center is pleased to announce our Fellows for the upcoming academic year. Carr Center Fellowships offer scholars and practitioners the opportunity to spend a semester or year at Harvard conducting research, sharing experiences with students, and exploring critical human rights issues with a distinguished group of peers. Our fellows come with a range of experience as researchers, practitioners and leaders in the filed of human rights.

See more information on all of Carr Center's fellows for the 2016-2016 year.

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Migration

The Carr Center conducts research on migration, refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs). Our analysis focuses on the human rights of those fleeing conflict and instability.

Genocide

The Carr Center seeks to draw attention to acts of mass atrocity and genocide, analyzing strategies and tools to better prevent and respond to these massive violations of human rights.

Political Prisoners

The Carr Center investigates the detention of citizens on political grounds, their arbitrary detention and violations of their fundamental human rights.

2016 Sep 22

Book Talk: 'Rape During Civil War'

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

124 Mt Auburn St, Suite 200 North

Join us for a book talk with Dara Kay Cohen, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School as she presents findings from her recently published work Rape During Civil War.

Panelists:

Dara Kay Cohen, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School, Author of Rape During Civil War

Elisabeth Wood, Professor of Political Science & International and Area Studies,...

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Federica D’Alessandra. 2014. “Israel’s Associated Regime: Exceptionalism, Human Rights and Alternative Legality.” Utrecht Journal of International and European Law. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In the context of Israel’s declared permanent state of exception, this article focuses on the legal protection awarded to the Palestinian populations under Israeli control. To broaden the discussion over Palestinian people’s rights, which generally focuses on the confiscation of land and the right to return, the author consciously focuses on anti-terrorism and security measures, which contribute to the creation of what the International Court of Justice has defined as an ‘associated regime’ of occupation. The article is divided into three parts. In the first part, the author discusses Israel’s domestic obligations towards Palestinians (arguing the case of both Palestinian citizens of Israel, and Palestinian residents) and their de jure and de facto discrimination. The second part discusses the applicability of humanitarian law, specifically the applicability of the Fourth Geneva Convention. This section discusses the applicability of the Convention to both territories and people under Israeli control. The third part discusses the applicability of international human rights law to all territories under Israeli control and delves into the issue of the mutual relationship between the two international legal regimes in the territories under occupation. The article posits that Israel’s rationale for the non-applicability of such legislation to the Palestinian territories and populations it controls constitutes a form of ‘alternative legality’. The article concludes that Israel’s disproportionate application of security practices and anti-terrorism measures to the Palestinian segment of its population violates Palestinian rights protected under Israel’s domestic and international legal obligations.

Mathias Risse. 2014. “"Response to Arneson, de Bres, and Stilz".” Ethics & International Affairs, 28, 4, Pp. 511-522. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Common humanity is one ground of justice. The distinctively human life generates claims, and their form is that of natural rights. However, explorations of how the distinctively human life generates obligations lead only to a rather limited set of rights—basic security and subsistence rights. Inquiries into another nonrelational ground also produce rather limited results. That ground is humanity's collective ownership of the earth. The principle of justice associated with it merely requires an equal opportunity to use natural spaces and resources for the satisfaction of basic needs. In particular, this result is incompatible with any kind of welfarist commitment. The sheer fact that anybody's welfare as suchwould be lowered or raised is not a matter of justice. If people share associations with each other (membership in a state, or being connected by trade, say) we can derive obligations from their shared involvement with these associations. But unless people do indeed share such associations, the obligations that hold among them will be rather limited.

Zachary D. Kaufman. 4/7/2016. United States Law and Policy on Transitional Justice: Principles, Politics and Pragmatics, Pp. 382 pages. Oxford University Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In United States Law and Policy on Transitional Justice: Principles, Politics, and Pragmatics, Zachary D. Kaufman, J.D., Ph.D., explores the U.S. government’s support for, or opposition to, certain transitional justice institutions. By first presenting an overview of possible responses to atrocities (such as war crimes tribunals) and then analyzing six historical case studies, Dr. Kaufman evaluates why and how the United States has pursued particular transitional justice options since World War II. This book challenges the “legalist” paradigm, which postulates that liberal states pursue war crimes tribunals because their decision-makers hold a principled commitment to the rule of law. Dr. Kaufman develops an alternative theory—“prudentialism”—which contends that any state (liberal or illiberal) may support bona fide war crimes tribunals. More generally, prudentialism proposes that states pursue transitional justice options, not out of strict adherence to certain principles, but as a result of a case-specific balancing of politics, pragmatics, and normative beliefs. Dr. Kaufman tests these two competing theories through the U.S. experience in six contexts: Germany and Japan after World War II, the 1988 bombing of Pan Am flight 103, the 1990-1991 Iraqi offenses against Kuwaitis, the atrocities in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s, and the 1994  genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda. Dr. Kaufman demonstrates that political and pragmatic factors featured as or more prominently in U.S. transitional justice policy than did U.S. government officials’ normative beliefs. Dr. Kaufman thus concludes that, at least for the United States, prudentialism is superior to legalism as an explanatory theory in transitional justice policymaking.

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