Fellows

tengbiao

Teng Biao

Dr. Teng Biao is an academic lawyer and a human rights activist. He was formerly a Lecturer in the China University of Political Science and Law, a visiting... Read more about Teng Biao
s200_fernando.berdion-del_val

Fernando Berdion Del Valle

Fernando Berdion Del Valle is a fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, where he focuses on the history of human rights policy in international law. He is working with Professor Kathryn Sikkink on a project that investigates Latin American nations as protagonists in the development of the idea of international human rights.... Read more about Fernando Berdion Del Valle

fateha

Fateh Azzam

Fateh Azzam is a Senior Fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy and an Affiliate at the Middle East Initiative at Harvard Kennedy School. He was...

Read more about Fateh Azzam
annurima

Anurima Bhargava

 Anurima Bhargava served as the Chief of the Educational Opportunities Section of the Civil Rights Division at the U.S. Department of Justice.  She led the Division’s efforts to provide equal educational opportunities for all students by enforcing federal statutes that prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, sex, language status, religion and disability in schools and institutions of higher education.... Read more about Anurima Bhargava

Human Rights Documentation in Limited Access Areas: The Use of Technology in War Crimes and Human Rights Abuse Investigations. CCDP 2018-003, May 2018
Sushma Raman and Steven Livingston. 5/15/2018. Human Rights Documentation in Limited Access Areas: The Use of Technology in War Crimes and Human Rights Abuse Investigations. CCDP 2018-003, May 2018.Abstract
We offer a theoretical framework for understanding the role of technological capabilities (affordances) in documenting war crimes and human rights abuses in limited access areas.  We focus on three digital affordances: geospatial, digital network, and digital forensic science.  The paper argues that by leveraging digital affordances, human rights groups gain access to otherwise inaccessible areas, or to information that has been degraded in an effort to obfuscate culpability.  We also argue that the use of digital technology invites a reassessment of what we mean when we speak of a human rights organization.  Organizational morphology in digital space is hybrid in nature, with traditional organizations also taking on or joining more virtual or solely digital forms.

Pages