Faculty

2017 Sep 12

Open House & Exhibition: Carr Center for Human Rights Policy

3:30pm to 4:30pm

Location: 

Malkin Penthouse, Littauer Building, 4th floor

We welcome you to join us for our annual Open House event. Learn more about the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy and our mission to realize global justice through theory, policy, and practice.

We will discuss ways to get involved with the Carr Center, including learning and funding opportunities for students. There will also be a chance to meet and network with our faculty and ...

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2017 Apr 06
2017 Apr 13

Lunch seminar: Tensions at the Intersection of Development Aid and Human Rights

12:00pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Carr Conference Room, Rubenstein 219, 79 JFK St, Cambridge MA 02138

About the seminar:

Professor Robert Wilkinson will be discussing "Tensions at the Intersection of Development Aid and Human Rights." 

Lunch will be served.

About the speaker:

 

Robert WilkinsonRobert Wilkinson is a negotiation specialist, who helps organizations deal with negotiation, leadership and management challenges.  He is on the faculty at both the...

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Classroom technologies narrow education gap in developing countries
Steven Livingston. 8/23/2016. “Classroom technologies narrow education gap in developing countries.” Brookings. See full text.Abstract
Classroom technologies narrow education gap in developing countries by Steven Livingston
 
 

Well before the invention of laptops and the World Wide Web, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology mathematician, computer scientist, and education visionary Seymour Papertrealized that connected electronic devices could improve the educational experience of students, even for those who face poverty and geographical isolation. His recent death has a particular poignancy in Kenya where the extreme disparities in educational opportunities among different schools and students exacerbate already serious social and economic tensions. Several weeks ago, I traveled to Nairobi to gain some perspective on Papert’s vision.

Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age (Human Rights and Crimes against Humanity)
Jacqueline Bhaba. 2016. Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age (Human Rights and Crimes against Humanity). Reprint Edition. Princeton University Press. See full text.Abstract
Jacqueline Bhabha's book, Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age, offers the first comprehensive look at the global dilemma of child migration. 

 

Why, despite massive public concern, is child trafficking on the rise? Why are unaccompanied migrant children living on the streets and routinely threatened with deportation to their countries of origin? Why do so many young refugees of war-ravaged and failed states end up warehoused in camps, victimized by the sex trade, or enlisted as child soldiers? This book provides the first comprehensive account of the widespread but neglected global phenomenon of child migration, exploring the complex challenges facing children and adolescents who move to join their families, those who are moved to be exploited, and those who move simply to survive. Spanning several continents and drawing on the stories of young migrants, Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age provides a comprehensive account of the widespread and growing but neglected global phenomenon of child migration and child trafficking. It looks at the often-insurmountable obstacles we place in the paths of adolescents fleeing war, exploitation, or destitution; the contradictory elements in our approach to international adoption; and the limited support we give to young people brutalized as child soldiers. Part history, part in-depth legal and political analysis, this powerful book challenges the prevailing wisdom that widespread protection failures are caused by our lack of awareness of the problems these children face, arguing instead that our societies have a deep-seated ambivalence to migrant children–one we need to address head-on. Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age offers a road map for doing just that, and makes a compelling and courageous case for an international ethics of children’s human rights.

kathrynsikkink

Kathryn Sikkink

Ryan Family Professor of Human Rights Policy, HKS

Kathryn Sikkink works on international norms and institutions, transnational advocacy networks, the impact of human rights law and policies, and transitional justice. Her publications include The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions are Changing World Politics (awarded the Robert F. Kennedy Center Book Award, and the WOLA/Duke University Award); Mixed Signals: U.S. Human Rights Policy and Latin America; Activists Beyond Borders: Advocacy Networks in International Politics (co-authored with Margaret Keck and awarded the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas for Improving World Order, and the ISA Chadwick Alger Award for Best Book in the area of International Organizations); and The Persistent Power of Human Rights: From Commitment to Compliance, (co-edited with Thomas Risse and Stephen Ropp).... Read more about Kathryn Sikkink

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