The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy serves as the hub of the Harvard Kennedy School’s research, teaching, and training in the human rights domain. The center embraces a dual mission: to educate students and the next generation of leaders from around the world in human rights policy and practice; and to convene and provide policy-relevant knowledge to international organizations, governments, policymakers, and businesses.

 

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Latest Publications

The Fourth Generation of Human Rights: Epistemic Rights in Digital Lifeworlds

The Fourth Generation of Human Rights: Epistemic Rights in Digital Lifeworlds

Abstract:

In contrast to China’s enormous efforts to upgrade its system of governance to a new technological level built around a stupefying amount of data collection and electronic scoring, countries committed to democracy and human rights did not upgrade their systems. Instead of adjusting democracy and human rights to the new technological possibilities, those countries ended up with surveillance capitalism. It is vital for the sheer survival of those ideas about governance to perform such an upgrade. The present project aims to contribute to that. I propose a framework of epistemic actorhood in terms of four roles, and characterize digital lifeworlds and what matters about them, in terms of both how they fit in with Max Tegmark’s distinction among various stages of human life and how they give rise to their own episteme and the data episteme, with its immense possibilities of infopower (vocabulary inspired by Foucault). A set of epistemic rights that strengthen existing human rights—as part of a fourth generation of rights—is needed to protect epistemic actorhood in those roles, which would be a long way towards performing this kind of upgrade. In the long run, as we progress into Life 3.0, we need a new kind of human right, the right to the exercise of genuinely human intelligence. The good news is that, to the extent that we can substantiate the meaning of human life in the uncaring world that natural science describes, we can substantiate such a right vis-à-vis nonhuman intelligent life. We must hope that arguments of this sort can persuade a superior intelligence—which is by definition, massively beyond ours, and hard to anticipate.

Read the paper.

author/date: Mathias Risse | Sep 17 2021
teaser text: Life 3.0 and the development of non-human intelligent life call for a fourth generation of human rights, including the the right to the exercise of genuinely human intelligence.
Last updated on 09/28/2021

Carr Center Annual Report: 2020-2021

Citation:

Carr Center Human Rights for Policy. 9/14/2021. Carr Center Annual Report: 2020-2021. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Kennedy School. Publisher's Version
Carr Center Annual Report: 2020-2021

Abstract:

The Carr Center is pleased to release its 2020-2021 Annual Report. Take a look at our work, and learn how to get involved. 

This past academic year has been a year like no other. In many ways, our mission and work have never felt more relevant since the Center’s founding in 1999. Our 2020–2021 Annual Report highlights the Center’s mission, people, programs, and reach over the past year. In addition to the research, publications, and books developed by our experts, the Center has utilized podcasts, live virtual events, and social media to remain connected remotely with our ever-growing audience around the world. We’d like to thank the community of people who make our work possible: the Carr Center’s faculty, fellows, staff, and Advisory Board; the students at the Harvard Kennedy School; and each of you who has joined us in this unpredictable journey over the past year.

We hope that you remain engaged with our work in the coming months. After all, human rights are not just about institutions, laws, and policies. They are about people coming together, hoping to make the world and their communities a better place—more just, more equitable, and more peaceful. 

Read the Annual Report

 

: Carr Center | Sept 2021
: The Carr Center is pleased to release its 2020-2021 Annual Report. Take a look at our work, and learn how to get involved.

Media Freedom and Technological Change

Citation:

Vivek Krishnamurthy, Mark Latonero, Rachel Kuchma, Elif Nur Kumru, and Geneviève Plumptre. 8/11/2021. “Media Freedom and Technological Change.” Carr Center Discussion Paper Series. See full text.
Media Freedom and Technological Change

Abstract:

The concept of media freedom developed in the 20th century alongside efforts to advance governmental transparency and accountability in democracies. Media freedom empowers journalists, enabling them to act as checks on governments and other powerful social actors, and allowing them to contribute to a democratic discourse that is fact-based and accessible. The principle also provides an analytical framework for interrogating the central role that the news media plays in democratic societies. Even so, current understandings of media freedom remain rooted in the historical postwar moment that gave rise to the concept: a period that predates the information revolution and the proliferation of new communications technologies.

Technological change has transformed the economics of the news industry and undermined the ad-supported business models of legacy media organizations. This destabilization poses a fundamental challenge to the old model of media freedom, forcing questions of who today is entitled to media freedom and whether current media freedom protections are sufficient. To ensure the ongoing relevance of media freedom, the concept must evolve to address the contemporary conditions of news production, and the new impediments to gathering and disseminating fact-based information in the public interest.
 

Read the paper. 

: Krishnamurthy et al. | August 11 2021
: The concept of media freedom developed in the 20th century alongside efforts to advance governmental transparency and accountability in democracies.
Last updated on 08/11/2021
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Upcoming Events

2021 Nov 18

Pandemics and Portals: Rights in an Era of Technological Innovation

4:00pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Zoom Webinar (Registration Required)

Pandemics and Portals: Rights in an Era of Technological Innovation

Join the UCONN Human Rights Institute for the 2021 Annual Economic and Social Rights Lecture, featuring Sushma Raman. Sushma Raman is the Executive Director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy. She brings over two decades of global experience launching, scaling, and leading social justice and philanthropic programs and collaboratives, building capabilities of grassroots human rights organizations and their leaders, and teaching graduate courses in the public policy schools at Harvard Kennedy...

Read more about Pandemics and Portals: Rights in an Era of Technological Innovation
2021 Nov 30

Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America with Dr. Keisha N. Blain

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

Zoom Webinar

Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America is a manifesto for anyone committed to social justice. Authored by Carr Center Fellow Keisha N. Blain, the book challenges us to listen to a working-poor, Black woman activist with a disability who was an intellectual of the civil rights movement as we grapple with contemporary concerns around race, inequality, and social justice. Dr. Blain will be joined in discussion by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Ford Foundation Professor of History, Race, and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School, to demonstrate how...

Read more about Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America with Dr. Keisha N. Blain
2021 Dec 03

A Tribute to John Ruggie

9:00am to 10:15am

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration to Follow)

Join us for a tribute to the profound life and work of John Ruggie, whose efforts to create the United Nations Global Compact and the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights have made the world a more equal and just place.

Registration Link to Follow

Speakers: 

  • Mary Ruggie | Former Adjunct Professor, Harvard University
  • Mary Robinson | Former President of Ireland; Adjunct Professor on Climate Justice, Trinity College
  • Rachel...
Read more about A Tribute to John Ruggie
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“The Carr Center is building a bridge between ideas on human rights and the practice on the ground. Right now we are at a critical juncture. The pace of technological change and the rise of authoritarian governments are both examples of serious challenges to the flourishing of individual rights. It’s crucial that Harvard and the Kennedy School continue to be a major influence in keeping human rights ideals alive. The Carr Center is a focal point for this important task.”

 

- Mathias Risse