The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy serves as the hub of the Harvard Kennedy School’s research, teaching, and training in the human rights domain. The center embraces a dual mission: to educate students and the next generation of leaders from around the world in human rights policy and practice; and to convene and provide policy-relevant knowledge to international organizations, governments, policymakers, and businesses.

 

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Latest Publications

Half a Century After Malcolm X Came to Visit: Reflections on the Thin Presence of African Thought in Global Justice Debates.

Citation:

Mathias Risse. 4/17/2019. Half a Century After Malcolm X Came to Visit: Reflections on the Thin Presence of African Thought in Global Justice Debates.. Carr Center Discussion Paper Series. 2019007th ed. Cambridge: Carr Center for Human Rights Policy. See full text.
Half a Century After Malcolm X Came to Visit: Reflections on the Thin Presence of African Thought in Global Justice Debates.

Abstract:

What would it mean for there to be a genuinely and legitimately global discourse on justice that involves Africa in authentic ways?

There are various responses. On the one hand, there is the idea of “philosophical fieldwork” developed by Katrin Flikschuh. African thought that fell by the wayside due to European expansionism must be recuperated and inserted into that discourse. On the other hand, there is the world society approach pioneered by John Meyer and others. The point is that ideas  from elsewhere in the world can be genuinely and legitimately appropriated, which is how ideas have always spread. Once ideas about justice are appropriated by African thinkers, they are associated with Africa as much as with any other region. My goal here is to explore both approaches and support the second, while also making room for the first. In doing so, I articulate a view about how my own ongoing work on global justice can be seen as a contribution to an actual global discourse. There are rather large (and sensitive) issues at stake here: how to think about respectful appropriation of ideas and thus respectful philosophical discourse.  A great deal of nuance is needed.

: Mathias Risse | Apr 17 2019
: What would it mean for there to be a genuinely and legitimately global discourse on justice that involves Africa in authentic ways?
Last updated on 04/14/2020

Discrimination, Cognitive Biases and Human Rights Violations

Citation:

Mathias Risse. 4/5/2019. Discrimination, Cognitive Biases and Human Rights Violations. Carr Center Discussion Paper Series. 2019006th ed. Cambridge: Carr Center for Human Rights Policy. See full text.
Discrimination, Cognitive Biases and Human Rights Violations

Abstract:

Mathias Risse outlines his presentation at the First Colloquium on Discrimination, Cognitive Biases and Human Rights at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), on November 15th, 2018. 

 

: Mathias Risse | Apr 5 2019
: Mathias Risse discusses the connections between discrimination, cognitive biases and human rights violations.
Last updated on 02/04/2020

Democracy, Political Crisis, and Constitutional Jurisdiction

Citation:

Luís Roberto Barroso and Aline Osorio. 1/2019. “Democracy, Political Crisis, and Constitutional Jurisdiction.” In Judicial Power: How Constitutional Courts Affect Political Transformation, Pp. 163-182. Cambridge University Press. See full text.
Democracy, Political Crisis, and Constitutional Jurisdiction

Abstract:

Read Justice Luis Roberto Barroso's latest chapter on Judicial Power: How Constitutional Courts Affect Political Transformation. 
 
: Luis Roberto Barroso et al.| Jan 2019
: Judicial Power: How Constitutional Courts Affect Political Transformation
Last updated on 02/01/2020
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“The Carr Center is building a bridge between ideas on human rights and the practice on the ground. Right now we are at a critical juncture. The pace of technological change and the rise of authoritarian governments are both examples of serious challenges to the flourishing of individual rights. It’s crucial that Harvard and the Kennedy School continue to be a major influence in keeping human rights ideals alive. The Carr Center is a focal point for this important task.”

- Mathias Risse