The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy serves as the hub of the Harvard Kennedy School’s research, teaching, and training in the human rights domain. The center embraces a dual mission: to educate students and the next generation of leaders from around the world in human rights policy and practice; and to convene and provide policy-relevant knowledge to international organizations, governments, policymakers, and businesses.

 

News and Announcements

See all announcements

Latest Publications

Artificial Intelligence and the Past, Present, and Future of Democracy

Citation:

Mathias Risse. 7/28/2021. “Artificial Intelligence and the Past, Present, and Future of Democracy.” Carr Center Discussion Paper Series. See full text.
Artificial Intelligence and the Past, Present, and Future of Democracy

Abstract:

Located at the intersection of political philosophy, philosophy of technology and political history, this essay reflects on medium and long-term prospects and challenges for democracy that arise from AI, emphasizing how critical a stage this is. Modern democracies involve structures for collective choice that periodically empower relatively few people to steer the social direction for everybody. As in all forms of governance, technology shapes how this unfolds. Specialized AI changes what philosophers of technology would call the materiality of democracy, not just in the sense that independent actors deploy different tools. AI changes how collective decision making unfolds and what its human participants are like (how they see themselves in relation to their environment, what relationships they have and how those are designed, and generally what form of human life can get realized). AI and democracy are not “natural allies:” it takes active design choices and much political will for AI so serve democratic purposes.

Read the full paper

: Mathias Risse | July 26 2021
: How does AI instigate prospects and challenges for modern democracies in our near and distant futures?
Last updated on 07/26/2021

The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: A Panel Discussion

Citation:

The Carr Center Human Rights for Policy. 6/8/2021. “The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: A Panel Discussion .” Carr Center Discussion Paper Series. Read the Discussion.
The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: A Panel Discussion

Abstract:

May 31, 2021, marks the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, when a violent white mob nearly destroyed the formerly thriving and prosperous African American community in the Greenwood District of Tulsa, also known as Black Wall Street. Over 300 African Americans were killed, and thousands were displaced. Hundreds of homes and businesses burned to the ground. At the time, Greenwood, like so many African American neighborhoods and townships across the United States, was situated in a particular spatial and temporal context marked by both progress and promise, as well as violence and discrimination.

In the decades since, the Massacre was covered up, local officials obstructed the redevelopment of Greenwood, and the local chapter of the KKK became one of the largest in the US. We spoke with a group of leaders, policymakers, academics, and researchers to discuss the historical legacy of the Massacre, its effects on current-day policy and organizing debates related to racial justice, and the movement for reparations. We spoke with a group of leaders, policymakers, academics, and researchers to discuss the historical legacy of the Massacre, its effects on current-day policy and organizing debates related to racial justice, and the movement for reparations. Read the discussion

: Carr Center | June 8 2021
: Leaders, policymakers, academics, and researchers discuss the historical legacy of the Tulsa Race Massacre, its effects on current-day policy and organizing debates related to racial justice, and the movement for reparations.

The Promise and Pitfalls of the Facebook Oversight Board

Citation:

Flynn Coleman, Brandie Nonnecke, and Elizabeth M. Renieris. 5/6/2021. “The Promise and Pitfalls of the Facebook Oversight Board.” Carr Center Discussion Paper Series. Read the Discussion.
The Promise and Pitfalls of the Facebook Oversight Board

Abstract:

The Facebook Oversight Board recently issued its first decisions on content removals by Facebook. See what some of the Carr Center Technology and Human Rights Fellows had to say about the benefits, challenges, and risks of external oversight boards for platform governance and accountability.

Read the discussion.

: Carr Center Technology and Human Rights Fellows | May 6 2021
: What are the benefits, challenges, and risks of external oversight boards for platform governance and accountability?
Last updated on 05/06/2021
See all publications

Upcoming Events

2021 Oct 26

Digital Weapons: How Cyber Arms Proliferation Threatens Human Rights

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

Towards Life 3.0: Ethics and Technology in the 21st Century is a talk series organized and facilitated by Dr. Mathias Risse, Director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, and Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights, Global Affairs, and Philosophy. Drawing inspiration from the title of Max Tegmark’s book, Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence, the series draws upon a range of scholars, technology leaders, and public interest technologists to address the ethical aspects of the long-term impact of artificial intelligence on society and...

Read more about Digital Weapons: How Cyber Arms Proliferation Threatens Human Rights

Registration: 

2021 Oct 28

Critical Race Theory

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

Please join the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy for one of its signature series this fall, The Fierce Urgency of Now, drawing upon the famous quote by Martin Luther King, Jr., when he said, “We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there "is" such a thing as being too late. This is no time for apathy or complacency. This is a time for vigorous and positive action.” The fall series will focus on the intersection of racial, economic, and social justice in the United States. Information on how to access the event can...

Read more about Critical Race Theory

Registration: 

2021 Nov 02

Why We Need AI Ethics with Dr. John Tasioulas

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

Towards Life 3.0: Ethics and Technology in the 21st Century is a talk series organized and facilitated by Dr. Mathias Risse, Director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, and Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights, Global Affairs, and Philosophy. Drawing inspiration from the title of Max Tegmark’s book, Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence, the series draws upon a range of scholars, technology leaders, and public interest technologists to address the ethical aspects of the long-term impact of artificial intelligence on society and...

Read more about Why We Need AI Ethics with Dr. John Tasioulas

Registration: 

  •  
  • 1 of 4
  • »
See all events

 

“The Carr Center is building a bridge between ideas on human rights and the practice on the ground. Right now we are at a critical juncture. The pace of technological change and the rise of authoritarian governments are both examples of serious challenges to the flourishing of individual rights. It’s crucial that Harvard and the Kennedy School continue to be a major influence in keeping human rights ideals alive. The Carr Center is a focal point for this important task.”

 

- Mathias Risse