The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy serves as the hub of the Harvard Kennedy School’s research, teaching, and training in the human rights domain. The center embraces a dual mission: to educate students and the next generation of leaders from around the world in human rights policy and practice; and to convene and provide policy-relevant knowledge to international organizations, governments, policymakers, and businesses.

 

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Latest Publications

You Purged Racists From Your Website? Great, Now Get to Work

You Purged Racists From Your Website? Great, Now Get to Work

Abstract:

Joan Donovan explains that the covid-19 infodemic has taught social media giants an important lesson: they must take action to control the content on their sites. 

For those who follow the politics of platforms, Monday’s great expulsion of malicious content creators was better late than never. For far too long, a very small contingent of extremely hateful content creators have used Silicon Valley’s love of the First Amendment to control the narrative on commercial content moderation. By labeling every effort to control their speech as “censorship,” these individuals and groups managed to create cover for their use of death threats, harassment, and other incitements to violence to silence opposition. For a long time, it has worked. Until now. In what looks like a coordinated purge by Twitch, Reddit, and YouTube, the reckoning is here for those who use racism and misogyny to gain attention and make money on social media.

Read the full article.

: Joan Donovan | July 1 2020
: Joan Donovan explains that the covid-19 infodemic has taught social media giants an important lesson: they must take action to control the content on their sites. 
Last updated on 08/04/2020

The Future of Nonviolent Resistance

Citation:

Erica Chenoweth. 7/2020. “The Future of Nonviolent Resistance.” Journal of Democracy , 31, 3, Pp. 69-84. See full text.
The Future of Nonviolent Resistance

Full Text

Erica Chenoweth examines the recent decline of civil-resistance campaigns and argues recent setbacks, like the pandemic, have served as a much-needed reset for movements around the world.

Over the past fifty years, nonviolent civil resistance has overtaken armed struggle as the most common form of mobilization used by revolutionary movements. Yet even as civil resistance reached a new peak of popularity during the 2010s, its effectiveness had begun to decline—even before the covid-19 pandemic brought mass demonstrations to a temporary halt in early 2020. This essay argues that the decreased success of nonviolent civil resistance was due not only to savvier state responses, but also to changes in the structure and capabilities of civil-resistance movements themselves. Perhaps counterintuitively, the coronavirus pandemic may have helped to address some of these underlying problems by driving movements to turn their focus back to relationship-building, grassroots organizing, strategy, and planning.

: Erica Chenoweth | July 2020
: Erica Chenoweth examines the recent decline of civil-resistance campaigns and argues recent setbacks, like the pandemic, have served as a much-needed reset for movements around the world.
Last updated on 07/31/2020

Attacks on the Press Track a Democratic Backslide

Attacks on the Press Track a Democratic Backslide

Abstract:

According to Sushma Raman, freedom of press is eroding around the world - including in democratic countries.

The recent conviction of the journalist Maria Ressa in the Philippines for “cyber libel” has brought into sharp relief the global deterioration of press freedom. Across the world, fundamental freedoms of association, expression, and assembly are under threat. A recent report from Civicus found that twice as many people live under repression today as a year ago. Although much of that is due to diminishing freedoms in countries whose governments have long been known for their heavy hands, an increasing number of attacks on the media have come in places where press freedom was once enshrined.

Read the full article.

: Sushma Raman | June 29 2020
: According to Sushma Raman, freedom of press is eroding around the world - including in democratic countries.
Last updated on 07/22/2020
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Upcoming Events

2021 Nov 30

Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America with Dr. Keisha N. Blain

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

Zoom Webinar

Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America is a manifesto for anyone committed to social justice. Authored by Carr Center Fellow Keisha N. Blain, the book challenges us to listen to a working-poor, Black woman activist with a disability who was an intellectual of the civil rights movement as we grapple with contemporary concerns around race, inequality, and social justice. Dr. Blain will be joined in discussion by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Ford Foundation Professor of History, Race, and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School, to demonstrate how...

Read more about Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America with Dr. Keisha N. Blain
2021 Dec 03

A Tribute to John Ruggie

9:00am to 10:15am

Location: 

Zoom Webinar (Registration Required)

Join us for a tribute to the profound life and work of John Ruggie, whose efforts to create the United Nations Global Compact and the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights have made the world a more equal and just place.

Speakers: 

  • Anita Ramasastry | Chair, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
  • Mary Ruggie | Former Adjunct Professor, Harvard University
  • Mathias Risse | Faculty Director, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy;...
Read more about A Tribute to John Ruggie
2021 Dec 07

Technology for Social Good? AI, Human Rights, and Harm Reduction with Dr. Jay Aronson

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

The volume of information available to human rights practitioners has grown steadily since the globalization of Internet access and the widespread adoption of smartphones across geographies, cultures, and socioeconomic classes. This vast material landscape creates an unprecedented visual record of the experiences of a significant percentage of humanity. When properly collected and analyzed, this material can help human rights analysts, fact-finders, and researchers reconstruct war crimes, human rights violations, and terrorist acts taking place in locations that offer limited or no...

Read more about Technology for Social Good? AI, Human Rights, and Harm Reduction with Dr. Jay Aronson

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“The Carr Center is building a bridge between ideas on human rights and the practice on the ground. Right now we are at a critical juncture. The pace of technological change and the rise of authoritarian governments are both examples of serious challenges to the flourishing of individual rights. It’s crucial that Harvard and the Kennedy School continue to be a major influence in keeping human rights ideals alive. The Carr Center is a focal point for this important task.”

 

- Mathias Risse