Human Rights, Ethics, and Artificial Intelligence: Challenges for the next 70 Years of the Universal Declaration

Date: 

Fri - Sat, Nov 30 to Dec 1, 8:00am - 6:30pm

Location: 

Wexner 434 AB, Harvard Kennedy School

A Joint Conference Sponsored by the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, to be held Nov 29 (evening)-Dec 1, 2018, at the Harvard Kennedy School.

*Registration is now closed.* Please email
carr_center@hks.harvard.edu with any questions.

Download the full agenda.

Day 1: This event commences the evening of November 29th, with a public lecture by Cynthia Dwork.
Thursday, November 29, 2018, 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Open to the public - first come, first served

Panels include:

Day 2: (November 30)

  • Barbara Grosz, Harvard University, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
    FROM ETHICAL CHALLENGES OF INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS TO EMBEDDING ETHICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION
     
  • Solon Barocas, Cornell University, Department of Information Science
    ACCOUNTING FOR ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: RULES, REASONS, RATIONALES
     
  • Stephen Wolfram, Wolfram Research
    THE END OF HUMAN EXCEPTIONALISM?
     
  • FLASH PRESENTATIONS BY INAUGURAL HARVARDTECHTOPIA GROUP
    Hannah Hilligoss | Moderator, Project Coordinator, Cyberlaw Clinic, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society
    Jenny Fan, Master in Design Engineering, 2019, Harvard Graduate School of Design
    Luis Valles, Master in Business Administration, 2020, Harvard Business School
    Joshua Simons, PhD in Government, 2022, Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
    Irene Solaiman, Master in Public Policy, 2019
     
  • Max Tegmark, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics; Future of Life Institute
    HOW TO GET EMPOWERED, NOT OVERPOWERED, BY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
     
  • Jonathan Zittrain, George Bemis Professor of International Law, Harvard Law School, Harvard University
    WHAT'S WORSE: MACHINE LEARNING THAT DOESN'T WORK, OR MACHINE LEARNING THAT DOES?


    Day 3: (December 1)
     
  • Susan Schneider, University of Connecticut, Department of Philosophy
    TRANSCENDING THE BRAIN? AI, RADICAL BRAIN ENHANCEMENT, AND THE NATURE OF CONSCIOUSNESS
     
  • Mathias Risse, Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Philosophy and Public Administration, Harvard Kennedy School, Faculty Director, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy
    HUMAN RIGHTS AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: THE LONG (WORRISOME?) VIEW
     
  • PANEL - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN RIGHTS LAW IN THE HERE AND NOW
    • Moderator -  Vivek Krishnamurthy, Foley Hoag LLP and Harvard Law School
    • Michael Karamian, Legal and Corporate Affairs, Microsoft
    • Amy Lehr, Director of Human Rights, Center for Strategic and International Studies
    • Nani Jansen Reventlow, Director, Digital Freedom Fund
    • Can Yeginsu, Barrister, 4 New Square Chambers and Columbia Law School
       
  • John Basl and Ron Sandler, Northeastern University, Department of Philosophy
    CONTEXTUALIZING CALLS FOR AI TRANSPARENCY AND FAIRNESS
     
  • Nien-He Hsieh, Harvard Business School
    RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS IN THE DIGITAL ECONOMY: WHAT'S NEW?


    tommBackground:  Dec. 10, 2018 marks the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The human rights movement with its moral, legal and organizational ramifications has been one of the great innovations of the 20th century. Much has been achieved, but the world continues to fall short of human-rights ideals in numerous ways. Now is also the time to look ahead to the next 70 years, an era likely marked by technological breakthroughs at an unprecedented scale. Artificial Intelligence is increasingly present in our lives, reflecting a growing tendency to turn for advice, or turn over decisions altogether, to algorithms. The effectiveness of algorithms is increasingly enhanced through Big Data: availability of an enormous amount of data on all human activity. The key idea behind human rights is that power be used in ways that protect and advance basic human interests, especially those of the most vulnerable, and that there is a global responsibility to make sure of this. New technology greatly helps with these goals, but there are also dangers. In the short term these dangers range from perpetuation of bias in algorithmic reasoning to use of technology to create “alternative facts.” In the longer term, we must worry about ownership of data, increasing power of tech companies, changes in the nature of work and perhaps eventually existential risk through advent of entities that are not alive in familiar ways but might be sentient and intellectually and even morally superior to humans. This conference explores ways in which technological change will affect human life, especially the rights designed to protect that life, in the next 70 years and beyond.

  • In the larger picture, this conference stands at the intersection of closely connected emerging agendas at the Carr Center and the EJ Safra Center, as well as at the intersection of broader interests around Harvard in benefits and challenges from technological breakthroughs and artificial intelligence in particular. Alongside other human rights centers at Harvard, Carr responds to the UDHR’s anniversary by reflecting on the past, present and future of human rights. The bigger question behind that is how the institutional protection of the distinctively human life can be assured in an era of exploding technological innovation. EJ Safra seeks to explore how such innovation engages human values and a broad range of ethical issues that arise from our ways of using technology and perhaps eventually from sharing our lives with forms of technology that for now are merely imaginable. At stake is nothing less than the future of human life and its organizational possibilities, what that life will look like, and whether it might eventually be threatened at an existential level by its own innovations. Many initiatives are emerging in this domain at Harvard. It is time to bring them together and to make sure the ethical dimensions of these changes take center stage in Harvard’s agenda.

  • Conference Organizer: Mathias Risse, Director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Philosophy and Public Administration.