The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy serves as the hub of the Harvard Kennedy School’s research, teaching, and training in the human rights domain. The center embraces a dual mission: to educate students and the next generation of leaders from around the world in human rights policy and practice; and to convene and provide policy-relevant knowledge to international organizations, governments, policymakers, and businesses.

 

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Latest Publications

Carr Center Annual Report: 2020-2021

Citation:

Carr Center Human Rights for Policy. 9/14/2021. Carr Center Annual Report: 2020-2021. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Kennedy School. Publisher's Version
Carr Center Annual Report: 2020-2021

Abstract:

The Carr Center is pleased to release its 2020-2021 Annual Report. Take a look at our work, and learn how to get involved. 

This past academic year has been a year like no other. In many ways, our mission and work have never felt more relevant since the Center’s founding in 1999. Our 2020–2021 Annual Report highlights the Center’s mission, people, programs, and reach over the past year. In addition to the research, publications, and books developed by our experts, the Center has utilized podcasts, live virtual events, and social media to remain connected remotely with our ever-growing audience around the world. We’d like to thank the community of people who make our work possible: the Carr Center’s faculty, fellows, staff, and Advisory Board; the students at the Harvard Kennedy School; and each of you who has joined us in this unpredictable journey over the past year.

We hope that you remain engaged with our work in the coming months. After all, human rights are not just about institutions, laws, and policies. They are about people coming together, hoping to make the world and their communities a better place—more just, more equitable, and more peaceful. 

Read the Annual Report

 

: Carr Center | Sept 2021
: The Carr Center is pleased to release its 2020-2021 Annual Report. Take a look at our work, and learn how to get involved.

Media Freedom and Technological Change

Citation:

Vivek Krishnamurthy, Mark Latonero, Rachel Kuchma, Elif Nur Kumru, and Geneviève Plumptre. 8/11/2021. “Media Freedom and Technological Change.” Carr Center Discussion Paper Series. See full text.
Media Freedom and Technological Change

Abstract:

The concept of media freedom developed in the 20th century alongside efforts to advance governmental transparency and accountability in democracies. Media freedom empowers journalists, enabling them to act as checks on governments and other powerful social actors, and allowing them to contribute to a democratic discourse that is fact-based and accessible. The principle also provides an analytical framework for interrogating the central role that the news media plays in democratic societies. Even so, current understandings of media freedom remain rooted in the historical postwar moment that gave rise to the concept: a period that predates the information revolution and the proliferation of new communications technologies.

Technological change has transformed the economics of the news industry and undermined the ad-supported business models of legacy media organizations. This destabilization poses a fundamental challenge to the old model of media freedom, forcing questions of who today is entitled to media freedom and whether current media freedom protections are sufficient. To ensure the ongoing relevance of media freedom, the concept must evolve to address the contemporary conditions of news production, and the new impediments to gathering and disseminating fact-based information in the public interest.
 

Read the paper. 

: Krishnamurthy et al. | August 11 2021
: The concept of media freedom developed in the 20th century alongside efforts to advance governmental transparency and accountability in democracies.
Last updated on 08/11/2021

Artificial Intelligence and the Past, Present, and Future of Democracy

Citation:

Mathias Risse. 7/28/2021. “Artificial Intelligence and the Past, Present, and Future of Democracy.” Carr Center Discussion Paper Series. See full text.
Artificial Intelligence and the Past, Present, and Future of Democracy

Abstract:

Located at the intersection of political philosophy, philosophy of technology and political history, this essay reflects on medium and long-term prospects and challenges for democracy that arise from AI, emphasizing how critical a stage this is. Modern democracies involve structures for collective choice that periodically empower relatively few people to steer the social direction for everybody. As in all forms of governance, technology shapes how this unfolds. Specialized AI changes what philosophers of technology would call the materiality of democracy, not just in the sense that independent actors deploy different tools. AI changes how collective decision making unfolds and what its human participants are like (how they see themselves in relation to their environment, what relationships they have and how those are designed, and generally what form of human life can get realized). AI and democracy are not “natural allies:” it takes active design choices and much political will for AI so serve democratic purposes.

Read the full paper

: Mathias Risse | July 26 2021
: How does AI instigate prospects and challenges for modern democracies in our near and distant futures?
Last updated on 07/26/2021
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Upcoming Events

2021 Sep 23

Intersectionality with Dr. Priscilla Ocen

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

Please join the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy for one of its signature series this fall, The Fierce Urgency of Now, drawing upon the famous quote by Martin Luther King, Jr., when he said, “We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there "is" such a thing as being too late. This is no time for apathy or complacency. This is a time for vigorous and positive action.” The fall series will focus on the intersection of racial, economic, and social justice in the United States. Information on how to access the event can...

Read more about Intersectionality with Dr. Priscilla Ocen

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2021 Sep 28

Privacy is Power with Dr. Carissa Véliz

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

As surveillance creeps into every corner of our lives, Dr. Carissa Véliz exposes how our personal data is giving too much power to big tech and governments, why that matters, and what we can do about it. Without your permission, or even your awareness, tech companies are harvesting your location, your likes, your habits, your relationships, your fears, your medical issues, and sharing it amongst themselves, as well as with governments and a multitude of data vultures. They're not just selling your data. They’re selling the power to influence you and decide for you. Even when you’ve...

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2021 Oct 07

Redeeming Justice

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

Redeeming Justice draws from the lived experience of the project's co-authors who were sentenced to life without the possibility of parole (LWOP) over three decades ago and human rights law to argue for a right to redemption. The central argument is that all human beings are capable of change and that this should be reflected in the law, meaning that impermeable sentences like LWOP, which allow for no opportunity to revisit indefinite incarceration, amount to cruel and unusual punishment. The article will be published in the Northwestern Law Review in October. Please find a link...

Read more about Redeeming Justice

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“The Carr Center is building a bridge between ideas on human rights and the practice on the ground. Right now we are at a critical juncture. The pace of technological change and the rise of authoritarian governments are both examples of serious challenges to the flourishing of individual rights. It’s crucial that Harvard and the Kennedy School continue to be a major influence in keeping human rights ideals alive. The Carr Center is a focal point for this important task.”

 

- Mathias Risse