Alejandro Chehtman

Alejandro Chehtman

Fellow
Alejandro  Chehtman

Alejandro Chehtman is Associate Professor at the Law School of the University Torcuato Di Tella and a Fellow at the Argentine National Research Council (CONICET). He is also co-Director of the Supreme Court Project at UTDT and CONICET Fellow at the Universidad de Girona (Spain). He studied Law at the University of Buenos Aires, where he graduated with honors, and did his MSc in Political Theory and his PhD in Law at the LSE. His main research interests are Public International Law, International Criminal Law, International Humanitarian Law, and Constitutional Law, with special interest in philosophical and empirical issues. Alejandro has published articles in leading peer-reviewed journals, such as the European Journal of International Law, Legal Theory, Journal of International Criminal Justice,  Law & Philosophy y Stanford Journal of International Law. His book, The Philosophical Foundations of Extraterritorial Punishment, was published by Oxford University Press. 

Before coming to Di Tella, Dr Chehtman clerked at the Federal Appeals Chamber for Criminal Matters, and worked at the Public Defence Office in Buenos Aires. He was a Fellow at the Law Department at LSE between 2006-9, Research Associate to the Center for International Courts and Tribunals, at UCL, between 2008-11, and a Marie Curie Fellow at the Faculty of Law at UCL 2014-5.
 
He is currently part of the Research Panel at Matrix Chambers, London, and a member of Project on International Courts and Tribunals.
 

Research
Alejandro will be working on two projects while at Harvard. He will be writing a piece on the "Constitutionalization of Human Rights in Latin America" for the Oxford Handbook of Latin American Constitutionalism (solicited piece) and working on his second book, A Theory of Asymmetrical Conflicts, under contract with Oxford University Press. This book explores how asymmetrical tactics, new weapons, and contemporary participants challenge the standard framework of the laws of armed conflict and propose a normatively defensible and practically feasible framework to address them.